Socioemotional Well-Being

one’s outlook and one’s ability to understand and control one’s emotions and others’ emotions, and one’s ability to connect effectively with the key people in one’s life.

Maintaining strong connections with a circle of key family and friends can be key to emotional well-being (Derrickson family at Mirror Lake in Yosemite Valley, 2015)

Maintaining strong connections with a circle of key family and friends can be key to emotional well-being (Derrickson family at Mirror Lake in Yosemite Valley, 2015)

“When a person has access to both the intuitive, creative and visual right brain, and the analytical, logical, verbal left brain, the whole brain is working….and this tool is best suited to the reality of what life is, because life is not just logical – it is also emotional.”

Steven Covey

We turn now to how to effectively control our own emotions, communicate well and maintain supportive relationships. Similar to the spiritual arena, where the approach was specifically non-religious, in the this arena the vast and complicated area of mental health is left to the professionals. This page overviews the content of The Wellness Compass Travel Guide chapters 6-10 devoted to the three goals of the socialemotional wellness domain.

 

 Highlights.

Emotional intelligence (EI) is “the capacity to reason about emotions, and of emotions to enhance thinking.” It has four domains that are defined by the emotional action (either to recognize emotions or to manage them); and, the target of the action (either one’s self or social interactions actions with another). Although enhancing EI is not a specific goal of the Wellness Compass® various aspects of emotional awareness and emotional management have been integrated into other Wellness Compass® goals and activities. 

Chapter 6.  Overview of Socioemotional well-being

Emotional intelligence (EI) is “the capacity to reason about emotions, and of emotions to enhance thinking.” It has four domains that are defined by the emotional action (either to recognize emotions or to manage them); and, the target of the action (either one’s self or social interactions actions with another). Although enhancing EI is not a specific goal of the Wellness Compass® various aspects of emotional awareness and emotional management have been integrated into other Wellness Compass® goals and activities. 

Enhance your Emotional Intelligence has been integrated into Wellness CompassThere are five basic personality traits. You either have them by nature or nurture, or you have the opposite trait. Travelers are encouraged to assess if they are innately: open, agreeable, extraverted, conscientious and/or emotionally stable; and to apply this this information to their own emotional awareness and self-control.

Chapter 7: Cheerful. The darkness of wrongdoing constantly surrounds us. Unless we consciously choose to be as positive and joyful as possible, it can easily overwhelm us with its negativity, creating a constant stream of negative emotions. This chapter focuses on the key emotion of joy and how to maintain a cheerful outlook.

Chapter 8. Connected. To be successful in our social interactions, we must form strong relationships. Relationships are based on trust, respect, care, and effective communication. Being an effective communicator requires an understanding of the process, the channels, and actually caring about the extent to which the message delivered was received as intended. This chapter focuses on key communication skills so that wellness travelers can maintain strong connections with the key people in their lives, so they can obtain the connected goal of being supported and supporting others well.

Chapter 9: Self-control. Despite a positive attitude and effective communication, you can make a mess of your life and create lots of unhappiness if you don’t consistently have self-control. Thus the final chapter on socioemotional well-being focuses first on the virtue of patience, then on the relationship between self-confidence and self-control, and finally concludes with tips on how to maintain self-control in difficult situations.

Appendix C contains an example of “Derry’s Journey to Enhanced Self-Control” so readers can see one way in which the tools included in The Wellness Compass Travel Guide can be utilized to improve their well-being.

Related Blog Posts.

 

References 

[1] World Health Organization, The World Health Report 2001. Mental Health: New Understanding, (Geneva, Switzerland, 2001), retrieved on June 8, 2016, from http://www.who.int/whr/2001/en/whr01_en.pdf?ua=1; University of California–Riverside, Seven-dimensions of Wellness, retrieved on June 8, 2016, from http://wellness.ucr.edu/seven_dimensions.html; Centers for Disease Control, Health-Related Quality of Life. WellBeing Concepts, 2013, retrieved on June 8, 2016, from http://www.cdc.gov/hrqol/wellbeing.htm.